Torquay United will move up a place, from 15th to 14th, under the latest plan to end the Vanarama National League season on a points-per-game basis.

Clubs in the NL Premier, North and South Divisions are voting this weekend on a new set of proposals from the league’s board which come in the wake of the (EFL) Football League’s decision to adopt a similar path in their own Leagues One and League Two.

The NL is still preparing to go ahead with its own play-offs, to find a second team to be promoted behind champions Barrow.

Points-per-game will see King’s Lynn leapfrog over York City to win the NL North and Wealdstone promoted from the South, with only Chorley relegated from the NL ‘Premier’.

Barnet would move up from 11th to seventh, knocking Stockport County out of the NL play-offs, but there would be no POs in the North or South.

Gulls manager Gary Johnson said: “From what I’ve heard, it was a very positive meeting of the National League with the FA this week.

“A handful of teams will lose out, like Chorley, York and Stockport in the National League and Tranmere and Peterborough in the EFL, and they will be aggrieved but there’s not been a lot in our control, you couldn’t please everybody and I don’t know what else the authorities could have done.

“I am pretty sure people will vote for the resolution, and there’s no use voting for part of it.

“I am pleased the EFL have involved us, and the National League now needs to start next season at the same time as the EFL.”

Because Torquay still had ten games to go when the season was halted, two less than most of their rivals, they will move above Sutton United into 14th place. ‘PPG’ would give the Gulls 1.33pts to Sutton’s 1.32.

The NL Board is warning that, if their latest proposals do not gain the required 51% majority approval, they will then consider declaring the season null and void.

That would be a hugely damaging outcome, for it would mean abandoning promotion and relegation with the EFL completely, if only for one season.

All 24 NL Premier clubs have a vote, with eight more votes split between the North and South.