Reuniting with an old flame! 

Red Jowett Jupiter car first registered in February, 1952

Jowett Jupiter car first registered in February, 1952 - Credit: Malcolma on en.wikipedia

There are some who say that trawling social media looking for old acquaintances can be a dangerous game to play and I would agree.

After all, the previous relationship was in the past, both parties will have changed and it will only cause grief and consternation all round. And what can you possibly hope to achieve?

I was not really looking for her, but on reading some old colour magazines, there she was, my first true love, and wow what a figure. 

The memories all came flooding back and in a moment of madness I had to find out where she was. 

It was late, I was tired and on impulse just dialled the number and asked the secretary her whereabouts, if known. Yes, she is still known to us and this is the contact number in Evesham.

With trembling fingers and a lump in my throat, I dialled the number. A soft gentle voice answered and I gave my name. There was a moment of silence on the other end. Is that really you Paul? Yes, I stammered.

She replied swiftly, well I had always hoped you might get in touch one day but never knew if you would, or even could find us. Your beautiful Jowett Jupiter is here in the garage and we have nearly finished restoring her. You must come and visit us all. My husband is fitting the bumpers on as we speak.

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So, there we are, I have been invited to see my old sportscar which I acquired in 1969.

This was bought to drive into central London each day to further my education and which somehow never let me down, or so my rose-tinted memory tells me.

The Jupiter was made in Yorkshire from 1950 until the firm went bust in 1954, largely due to gearbox warranty claims across the range including the advanced Javelin saloon car.

My father drove one in the 1950s. Jowett enjoyed great competition success and it was very advanced with a sporty 1.5 litre flat four engine.

The Javelin had an American-styled ‘fastback’ and a plush interior with leather seats.

Being a small manufacturer, there was not enough research and development and all the cars suffered from water-logged electrics due to the low-slung nature of the engine. Wet days were difficult days!

When I came across the two-seater Jupiter with alloy body and light weight tubular chassis reminiscent of Jaguar’s XK120, it just had to be bought. £65 as I recall.

I suspect not many of us can track our early motor cars down but one good chum of mine still has his university days Singer Le Mans which was made in 1934.

An open two-seater sportscar with similar looks to the MG T series of the time.

I told him of my recent discovery and the pending visit to see my old flame.

He wisely stated that actually, she will be in better shape than me and won’t have lost her looks but just got a lot more expensive.

There’s truth in that for sure.

A word of caution, he said sternly. If you do go and see the old girl, try not to touch her.  

She might just lick you back!