Life's specs, drugs and sausage rolls 

Patients worry that if their morphine is taken away that the pain levels will worsen.

We compare our various ailments. - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Paul Harding, presenter at Torbay Hospital Radio: 

As I get older things tend to get harder and my joints ache more and I seem to have new ache every morning.

In fact, when I am in at Torbay Hospital radio on a Monday with Hugh to present our show it’s often like a game of top trumps as we compare our various ailments.

Replies are often not forthcoming as we have not heard what the other one says, but we do say ‘yes’ a lot just in case.

Of course, there can be no winner. Who would want to win that sort of contest?

Needless to say it happens with everyone I meet. Feel free to contact us if you fit into this category. 

How are you? Fine apart from my... and, yes, we are away with top trumps again.

Most Read

Luckily, we have ‘body mechanics’ who can help us. Yes, doctors and nurses and physios who can keep your clapped-out old body everyday ready.

Last week I had a cortisone injection in my ankle and for a short period of pain while I was jabbed, I am hoping for an extended period of little or no pain as I walk around.

What do they say, no pain - no gain?

It does mean I will have to complain about something else when I am talking to my mates. 

Of course, the list of faults only increases with age.

There seems to be many design faults and the days of bionic replacements I fear is still a way off.

Eyesight, hearing, bending, blood pressure and not forgetting Covid-flaming-19.

My body is beginning to feel like a pin cushion with vaccinations and injection therapy and soon a flu jab.

Hey, mustn’t complain. But if I don’t moan where is my conversation going to go?

Perhaps I should give it a try?

When in the radio studio I am reminded of one thing, that there are many people who are worse off than me.

So that is why a Monday afternoon’s show officially named Country Connections or unofficially A Bucketful of Racoons, is hopefully providing some light relief, so that patients can perhaps forget about those ‘body mechanics’ or aches for an hour or two.

A friend of mine reminded me of an old joke the other day when he asked me what I thought was important in life.

Now I went through all the usual things - good health, family, happiness. He just smiled and said that all he needed was a local optician and pharmacy and a Greggs in walking distance.

He added that he still felt young and for him life was still 'specs, drugs and sausage rolls'!

Paul Harding Presenter at Torbay Hospital Radio

Paul Harding, presenter at Torbay Hospital Radio - Credit: Submitted