Charity walk was 'eye-opening experience'

Owen Fiddy and Josh Arrow raised around £100 for Beat.

Owen Fiddy and Josh Arrow raised around £100 for Beat. - Credit: Submitted

Last Wednesday, March 31, two South Devon College students completed their sponsored-maid-outfit-walk.

raising money for the eating disorder charity Beat, Owen Fiddy and Josh Arrow raised around £100 in donations at the college in one day and the number is rising on their online Just Giving fundraiser -  www.justgiving.com/fundraising/owen-fiddy-josh-arrow.  

Looking very much like extras from Queen’s ‘I Want to Break Free’ music video, the pair began the walk at a frosty 9am and toured the grounds of the college until 3pm.

Already having their own predispositions and worries of wearing this bold choice of costume among peers and teachers, the students wanted to broadcast a statement that it is OK to not feel comfortable in the way you look but to also be kind in judging your appearance.  

Josh Arrow said: “It was actually quite an eye-opening experience. It made us realise that people don’t care anywhere near as much about how you look as you think they will in your head.”

Self-image is a colossal issue for many millennials and Gen-Z, those with or without eating disorders.

The marketing of Instagram and snapchat ‘filters’, the editing and airbrushing of front cover models, and the false pretences that what you see is all true.

The lack of transparency with social media especially is toxicity in a bottle. And we are never without the one tool that is a doorway into this virtual world.  

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Yes, this fundraiser provided some comic relief but for Owen Fiddy and Josh Arrow, they too conquered their fear of appearances and learnt that support rallies next to transparency.  

However, those battling with eating disorders must seek some sort of professional guidance and aid, which you can find at Beat or with your pastoral team at your own sixth form, college, or school.

We hope this fundraiser can represent conquering your fears and the stigma of seeking help with a positive outlook. Minus a maid costume.