For many people, lockdown has stolen something which we really need. Work.

William Arthur, columnist for the Torbay WeeklyWilliam Arthur, columnist for the Torbay Weekly

Though tiresome, and somewhat draining of energy, I think most people would agree with me that we need to work.

We need to work in order to fulfil our deeper need to solve a problem, to overcome a small, yet not insignificant portion of life’s mysteries, to attain an inner state of peace.

A much more obvious reason for work is the need for distraction.

While at home, watching the news or out in the garden, there is no break from the incessant chatter in our heads – a major culprit for anxiety and internal stress. But there is something we can do about it.

The socialist Karl Marx posed the idea that establishing control over our work and seeing its ability to transform society for the better, gives ourselves hope for a brighter future.

With lockdown imposed upon us, we may feel captive and lacking a sense of control in our lives.

It’s likely that working a full-time job or being in education has occupied all of your waking hours up to this point.

However, this new time on our hands gives us the opportunity to explore our, albeit less productive, but deeper interests and creative projects which may have previously been neglected.

Lockdown has inspired me to ‘fill the void’.

By this, I am referring to a more abstract notion of fulfilment.

What if work isn’t the problem in our lives that urges us to escape to a remote location – what if boredom is the real culprit of our dissatisfaction?

Having more free time than before, has perhaps shown us that too much freedom of time is equally, if not more paralysing than work.

What constitutes a life well spent is subjective but maybe what we all desire, apart from the temporary release of a holiday or luxury resort in the Bahamas, is work that we find engaging - which gives us a sense of progress.

So, to fill this inner void we feel, let’s fully engage with our work – whatever it may be.