After a short break, Torquay Museum’s archive alphabet is returning this week to bring you the letter S.

A Guards band marches through Torquay. In the background are the premises of the Westminster Bank, which later merged with National Provincial Bank. Also trading are Chanelle, Fullers and Timothy WhitesA Guards band marches through Torquay. In the background are the premises of the Westminster Bank, which later merged with National Provincial Bank. Also trading are Chanelle, Fullers and Timothy Whites

If you would like to access all the images from the museum’s archive alphabet, there is now have a dedicated page on the museum website.

Just log on to torquaymuseum.org, and explore the museum collections and you will find the pictorial records collection and the A-Z images.

If you would like to buy a print, just follow the instructions on screen.

The first letter S stands for the Strand.

This photograph from 1900 shows, among others, the premises of Williams & Cox, Iredale & Son, and NarracottsThis photograph from 1900 shows, among others, the premises of Williams & Cox, Iredale & Son, and Narracotts

As Torquay grew from a fishing village to an elegant winter health resort, so the service and distribution outlets emerged to provide for the nobility and gentry, who came to reside for the season.

The first nucleus of shops was on the Strand and the harbour area.

During the mid-19th century, the Strand formed the main parade of retail establishments. Some of the major retailers occupying prominent positions on the parade were chemists Timothy Whites, Bobby & Co, furnishers Williams & Cox, bookseller Iredales and draper Robert T. Knight.

The second S stands for Shapley & Sons Ltd.

Tram and connectors with Shapley’s advertising from the 1920sTram and connectors with Shapley’s advertising from the 1920s

Established in 1832, this company developed through various changes in trading name to become one of the leading grocery firms in Torquay.

Their well-stocked shop was backed by a warehouse in Swan Street.

On August 23, 1897, the West End branch in Lucius Street was opened. It was expensively and elaborately equipped in mahogany and marble by a leading firm of shop fitters.

By the 1930s, the firm had opened another branch shop in Walnut Road. However, by 1960 after almost 130 years of service, the business closed for the last time.